When SOMEBODY Emails NOBODY, Who Is CRACK?

Nobody:

“My second preference has always been English. I will not talk in Hindi. I am still upset that I was forced to study Hindi over Sanskrit in school.”

It is silly to dislike a language just because you were forced to study it – if you do so, you join the bazillions Tamilians who put forth exactly that argument. If you refuse to converse in Hindi, you lose the opportunity to communicate with so many millions of our brethren!

Ciao

– Somebody

***************************************************************************************

Somebody,

OK, I am still laughing reading your mail 🙂

A few clarifications before I start:

1. I think Hindi is a beautiful language. It is
extremely melodious to ears.
2. I love listening to Hindi film songs and ghazals
and certainly appreciate the lyrics in there.
3. I have watched tons of Hindi movies and will
continue to do so.
4. I can read, write and understand Hindi extremely
well. I cannot speak well because I haven’t tried.
5. I watched Hindi serials regularly on DD and never
once watched a Kannada serial (if it helps this
argument!).

So, which question of yours didn’t I answer? I thought
I did answer everything. If I missed something, that
would be purely accidental.

The only statement I disagree with in your mail is:
“If you refuse to converse in Hindi, you lose the
opportunity to communicate with so many millions of
our brethren!”.

That argument is very generic. If a person cannot
speak Kannada, even he/she will not be able to
communicate with millions of their brethren!!! So,
that argument is flawed. It assumes
magically that somehow Hindi is above the other
languages, and that’s exactly where I disagree.

My mother studied in Kannada and English mediums. But,
she can read, write and understand Hindi extremenly
well. Why? Because she loves learning new languages.
She understands several Indian languages and easily
picked up Hindi when she went to visit her brothers
who were in North India. That is different.

As for me, I had taken Kannada as my first language in
school. I wanted to take Sanskrit as my third
language. Hell no. I HAD to take Hindi as either the
first or third language. Basically, it was forced down
my throat. Seriously, this reminds me of the Nazi era.
Since when did such cultural dominance become
acceptable?

My argument is simple. I will not accept Hindi as some
superior language than other Indian languages.

It just amazes me to see how people take me for
granted. There would be 10 South Indians at a party,
and a couple from Hindi heartland come in and
automatically start conversing in Hindi. Really?!?!?!
Give me a break.

Your viewpoints maybe certainly different. You seem to
be more comfortable in reading and writing Hindi than
Kannada. So, perhaps your idea of national integration
is for every Indian to talk in Hindi. I don’t know, I
am just guessing. You are certainly entitled to your
opinions, obviosuly.

But, I will not accept it under any terms. Forcing
anything on anyone is rape and there is nothing pure
about it.

As you can imagine, I am quite passionate when such
topics come up 🙂 I rest my case now. Let me go do
some work.

Maybe, I should have made this a blog post 🙂

Fun Always!
Nobody

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42 Comments on “When SOMEBODY Emails NOBODY, Who Is CRACK?”

  1. Vasuki Says:

    Good post Nobody! Or is it somebody? 😉

  2. Aram Says:

    I am sure this very interesting dialogue between s.b.=”some body” and n.b.=”nobody” has entertained EVERYBODY.

    I agree cent percent with everything that DS has written here and it could not have been presented better.

    However, why does DS call himself a nobody, especially when he is talking to “somebody?” While we are yet to unmask our friend s.b. = “somebody,” we know now that DS is also quite a “somebody” in Kannada literature. as well as in the NRI circle in the USof A.

    He definitely is NOT a NOBODY. Surely, the transparent burkha doesn’t need to be unveiled to prove that he indeed is “somebody.”

    I don’t know if I have tied myself in nots or knots. I hope “nobody” is confused. “Anybody” care to untangle this knotty, naughty web spun by “some body” and “nobody” so that “everybody” is happy.

  3. Aram Says:

    “Forcing anything on anyone is rape and there is nothing pure
    about it.”

    In a comment to some older post here, I had said instinctively without much thought that English is a bastard language. This interesting exchange between “some body” and “nobody” inspires me to come back to this issue.

    What is the consequence of a rape — a bastard? Then English is that bastard – the vibrant, versatile, ever-growing language which is helping us Indians conquer the world!

    Read http://www.swaminomics.org/articles/20040314_how_english_survived.htm for proof of this.

    “When rape is inevitable, lie back and enjoy it.” In our case, we are today enjoying the fruits of this “rape,” by way of our fluency in English.

    The Law of Unintended Consequences” is indeed great. The divine scheme of things is indeed wonderful. We just need to take a new look at things in retrospective like Swaminathan.

  4. pArijAta Says:

    Very interesting, the way a language becomes both a binding force and a dividing force. When I meet someone who knows Kannada, I make it a point to speak Kannada. I am not so – er- patriotic with Telugu, however.

    I have not seriously tried speaking in Hindi. These days, when I do try, I get Sanskrit verbs, so I have just given it up.

    When we wre in the Bay Area, we had this meeting of all kaaryakartas of Samskrita Bharati. There were people from many places in the US, originating from many places in India. It was a great experience to see Sanskrit being the link-language. An eighteen-month-old included, everyone was conversing in Sanskrit with ease.

    About South Indians in a party, well, when have we seen South Indians, especially Kannadigas, (barring a few, of course) being so proud of their language anyway?
    When it comes to language (my experience is mainly with Kannada in Bangalore), I feel that many people always take the extreme views. They try to either follow Vatal Nagaraj or refuse to talk in Kannada while on MG Road!

  5. rads Says:

    o boy, this is soo juicy for me to walk away, but I shall let it simmer and stand on the sidelines and watch ;-p


  6. For me, language is not such an important thing to be fought for…for that matter nothing else is too..

    Its afterall language…which is a very powerful tool God has vested on us, we are using it for all the wrong things, language is the tool that creates ‘reality’ or the ‘reasonging’ of a particular thing.. So, lets be united beyond languages…language ‘problems’ are nothing but petty 😀

  7. neela Says:

    thought provoking comments…EVERYBODY !! 🙂

  8. Annonymous Says:

    somebodyjee :

    “If you refuse to converse in Hindi, you lose the opportunity to communicate with so many millions of our brethren! – Ciao”

    You seem to be a true blue blooded Bangalorean!

  9. neelanjana Says:

    Sorry Hindiphiles.

    Hindi is not superior to any other Indian language- just because it is spoken by more people. Then may be we chould have chosen Mandarin instead! If just by numbers Hindi becomes the “national language” then, house fly should be the national animal of India 😦

    BTW, Hindi is not the national language – it is one of the 17 national languages of India!

    While I consider learning *any* (including Mandarin 😉 ) language an asset, I do not like the hindi-ization happening in Karnataka (and other states).

    For the record,

    I can read/write/understand/speak Kannada, English, Tamil, Hindi;
    I can read/understand Samskrita, Marathi
    I can also understand Telugu and Malayalam to some extent

    and none of these is my mothertongue 🙂

    Just to prove that I do not belong to the koopa mandooka species 😉

    -neelanjana

  10. neelanjana Says:

    Just to make myself clearer

    “Then we we chould have chosen Mandarin instead!” – If the intentiin was only to communicate with millions of our brethern 🙂

    Don’t we say “vasudhaiva kuTumbakam”? – So there is no harm considerning the millions of Mandarin speaking people as our brethern 😮

  11. nilagriva Says:

    Hindi is a nice language. But I don’t *have* to learn it. I too hated Hindi in school. It doesn’t matter that I used to score very good marks in it.

    I really would like Samskrit to be the national language of India. The power and precision it wields is unmatched by any other language. This is not a flame bait, just my opinion.

    But we live in a democracy. And numbers rule. It is just because of numbers that Hindi got chosen as the “national” language of India. That is one thing I detest – the democratization of all and sundry. In fact, I don’t think democracy is easy for a country as large and diverse as India.

  12. Aram Says:

    I understand that in the institutes of higher learning students have the freedom to choose any subjects in addition to their core ones. Thus, a student preparing to master the electronic design and technology has also the freedom to attend Finance, Accounts classes, not for credits but for the sake of knowledge.

    Why can’t we look at introducing this concept at the High School level also? Let those who love Hindi go into Hindi classes and let those who want SumsKruta attend those classes.

  13. neelanjana Says:

    Unfortunately, what we have in our schools is

    “ondu kaNNige beNNe, ondu kaNNige suNNa”

    where the beNNe getting kaNNu = {Hindi speaking states + Tamil Nadu}, and the rest have to be happy with suNNa 😦

  14. BPuriSKabab Says:

    Aram – great article from TOI. Thanks for posting the link.

    DStud – I remember going on a camping trip in the US, with a bunch of Europeans. What struck me was how they talked to each other in English. I found it an unique experience to listen to English spoken with German, French, Scandinavian, Italian and Welsh accents.

    While I am sure that they all missed the opportunity to speak to millions of Germans by not knowing German (same argument advanced by somebody), the point is that we were able to communicate with each other.

    Sometimes practicality trumps demographics.

    BPSK

  15. krupa Says:

    I have had such arguments a zillion times!What I find annoying is many kannadigas speak in Hindi amongst themselves!!!! That seems so pointless-why call someone “saale”..when u can call them “maGane”?!

  16. October Showers Says:

    Why does everyone feel so thretened by Hindi? Hindi is not my mothertongue and i learnt it at school too and ofcourse through Hindi movies. I still talk my mothertongue to all the people who can understand it, but Hindi has given me the power to talk and convey my thoughts to those million others who dont. Just coz i can talk in Hindi does not mean i am undermining my own language. We definitly need a rashtrabasha and if Hindi it is, then so be it…

  17. Pavan Says:

    Let us attempt to make sign language the standard all over (I intended to embed a youtube video conveying the same)


  18. @ Vasuki:
    Everybody, isn’t it? 🙂

    @ Aram:
    Thanks for the nice Times of India link.

    @ pArijAta:
    True. languagae and religion both have that binding and dividing nature. And extremes in anything is bad.

    @ Rads:
    Awww…come on, it’s OK if you comment in Telugu. We will pretend we understood 🙂

    @ Srik:
    for me, langauge is certainly a very important part of my life, just like religion. It can never be “afterall a language” to me. I certainly don’t like anyone forcing their language or religion on me. I fail to understand how one language or religion can be superior to another.

    @ neela:
    Sure….:)

    @ anon:
    Yours is the first “truly Anonymous” comment on my blog. But, I bet I know you. It’s not that easy to fool me 😉

    @ Aparna:
    Well….

    @ neelanjana:
    Very nice argument. I certainly believe in being vry broad minded. But, vehemently oppose domination by someone, especially if I am averse to their idea of utopia. Oh, and you’ve pretty much spelt out your mother tongue there 🙂 And, the 8th schedule now lists 22 languages.

    @ nilagriva:
    I am surprised you agreed with me. I thought I ahd this discussion with you a long time back and that you had a different opinion then, no? And, 8th schedule is good enough, but if we really have to choose a nationa language Sanskrit should be the obvious choice, in my opinion.

    @ BPuriSKabab:
    Certainly, and that’s exactly the reason why Official Languages Act of 1963 and Official Languaages Rules of 1976 continue with English as the bridge language. But, in this case, I really don’t see a need for domination of Hindi over other Indian languages (most of which are older and richer in terms of literature, I may add).

    @ Krupa:
    And, I had never heard a “magaLe” until my wife used it on her sister. Yeah, she is a rowdy 🙂

    @ October Showers:
    Thanks for coming by my blog and dropping a comment. The question is not whethe you are threatened, the basic question is why choose one over the other? Sure, you can convey your thoughts to million others who speak Hindi. So, can you convey your thoughts to million others who speak only Bengali, Mandarin, or Dogri (assuming, none of those are your mother tongue). As I said earlier, that argument is flawed.

    @ Pavan:
    You have heard of Esperanto, haven’t you? It flopped quite badly though.

  19. neelanjana Says:

    @ds:

    That’s the first step in solving a puzzle 😉 Hope you got it right!

  20. neelanjana Says:

    and thanks for correcting me about the listing .. I knew several were added, but sure I was hopelessly out of date.

    -neelanjana


  21. DS, for me, langauge is certainly a very important part of my life, just like religion.

    Yes, for me too…. but its very much true that my language is not the only language that is in existance on the planet, just like me not the only person and me not better than any other. And, me not any lesser to anyone either.

    I dislike ‘forcing’ someone to learn a language too, but at the same time, learning a language is not as bad as it sounds. You learnt hindi whats the problem in it? You could’ve learnt Sanskrita outside the school as a selective subject, there are many institutions that are in this service, I assume you were not staying in some remote place where no sanskrit pandit was in sight.

    Or you could’ve chosen a different school that allowed you to take Samskrita also.

    For me…I had to study Hindi, ‘coz there was no Samskrita teacher in my school, and also there was no school that taught Samskruta in the surrounding 30KMs area! But I can prodly say that I am better off when it comes to understanding Samskrita, than many of my cousins and friends who studied Samskrita at school.

    Its all about chosing the options, not getting forced to chose one. Lets be more responsible..

    Finally, what is wrong in you studying Hindi? You learnt an extra language, and helped you communicating with many people over the age, lets not run away from the fact.

    Also, communication is more important than any language, isnt it?

  22. Veena Says:

    Oh My GOD… I thought learning languages was always fun for me.

    when we had to learn japanese or french or german at work.. do we show the same degree of apprehensiveness ?

  23. Aram Says:

    DestinationSRIK:

    “Also, communication is more important than any language, isnt it?”

    My own view too! And practised by most of my fellow Kannadigas, I suppose!

    There is an interesting prediction in http://parijata.blogspot.com/

    where somebody (no, not our favorite “somebody”) ಸಖೇದರಾಗಿ “ಕನ್ನಡದ ಆಯುಷ್ಯ ಇನ್ನು ಎಪ್ಪತ್ತು-ಎಂಭತ್ತು ವರ್ಷಗಳಷ್ಟು ಮಾತ್ರ ಎಂದು ಅನ್ನಿಸುತ್ತದೆ” ಎಂದು ಹೇಳಿದರು.

    Considering that recently Indonesia officially mourned the death of 4 languages, I think English is going to be on a killing spree.

    By the way, would someone ( I am cautious now about using the word “somebody”) tell us what language is used in telepathy?

    I have a hunch thought transference is going to be the next big revolution in communication technology.

    Will the thought transference mechanism allow the originator to think in the language of his choice, and then have the thought converted into the receptor’s language of choice?

    Will that put to an end once for all the tendency of the musclemen in Delhi to dominate?

  24. Aram Says:

    “And, I had never heard a “magaLe” until my wife used it on her sister.”

    I see you are a Kannadiga to the core, and don’t speak the ancient Shencottah version of Tamil at home.

  25. Aram Says:

    Neelanjana:

    Nice little poser on your mother tongue!

    Where do I confirm my answer?

  26. bachodi Says:

    You wrote this mail before your previous post right ? Now I got it ” I am king , lick my feet”

  27. neelanjana Says:

    @aram

    except that I am fluent in my mothertongue as well …


  28. @ Neelanjana:
    No problem…yes, I may have figured it out!!!

    @ Srik:
    Oh man, you are making me write too much, let me give it another shot 🙂

    Yes, for me too…. but its very much true that my language is not the only language that is in existance on the planet, just like me not the only person and me not better than any other. And, me not any lesser to anyone either.

    I didn’t say anywhere that my language is the only one on the planet, did I? Do you seriously believe that would be my attitude? Especially after reading my post where I say that no one language is superior to another.

    I dislike ‘forcing’ someone to learn a language too, but at the same time, learning a language is not as bad as it sounds. You learnt hindi whats the problem in it? You could’ve learnt Sanskrita outside the school as a selective subject, there are many institutions that are in this service, I assume you were not staying in some remote place where no sanskrit pandit was in sight.

    Or you could’ve chosen a different school that allowed you to take Samskrita also.

    Again, you say you dislike forcing a language on someone, but you seem to be fine that it was forced on me. And, I could have chosen a different school…how convenient!!! You do realize that you are trying to defend a flawed system, don’t you? You are missing the basic point here. The question is not whether I could have learnt Samskrita outside the school or if I could have changed the school, the problem is the “all are equal, but I am more equal” attitude.

    For me…I had to study Hindi, ‘coz there was no Samskrita teacher in my school, and also there was no school that taught Samskruta in the surrounding 30KMs area! But I can prodly say that I am better off when it comes to understanding Samskrita, than many of my cousins and friends who studied Samskrita at school.

    Sure, similarly, I studied in an English medium school and I bet my Kannada is better than that of so many people who studied in Kannada medium schools. That is not the point. That is never a point of argument. That is a known fact. And, I am not sure this adds anything to the argument I have in this post.

    Its all about chosing the options, not getting forced to chose one. Lets be more responsible..

    I question the cultural invasion and suddenly I am branded an irresponsible human being,huh? Oh well….

    Finally, what is wrong in you studying Hindi? You learnt an extra language, and helped you communicating with many people over the age, lets not run away from the fact.

    I wanted to learn Samskruta and I was forced to learn Hindi, and that’s a problem. I had no inclination of learning Hindi, but I was forced to learn the language and that’s a problem. You claim that you don’t like forcing languages on people. But when I tell you that people did force a language on me, you are giving me a list of benefits of the forcing. I really don’t understand.

    Also, communication is more important than any language, isnt it?
    Certainly. Langauage is the means to communicate. But, language is so much more. It’s part of who you are and your culture. It’s your identity.

    @ Veena:
    Yes, learning new languages is a wonderful experience. It is beautiful, actually. But, I do not appreciate culturally and politically motivated agenda.

    @ Aram:
    I am a Kannadiga, with a fairly decent grip on English.

    @ Bachodi:
    Actually, no. This mail is very recent.

    @ Neelanjana:
    Both reading and ‘writing’ ? 😉

  29. neelanjana Says:

    I haven’t seen anyone writing in it, but with my additional skills which most of my fellowmen lack, I think, I can!

    -neelanjana

  30. rads Says:

    hmmpff, people have lost the art of watching side shows and enjoying them!! :p

  31. some body Says:

    d.s.:

    one question – was there any compulsion to study english?

    – s.b.

  32. some body Says:

    rads:

    i am having fun seeing the responses become as long as the great bong’s! now g.b. has cross-country competition. each time he praises ganguly at dravid’s expense, we can gang up on him. until now, it was poor mohan (aralikatte) and me :-(.

    nothing like bringing up a common enemy to unite (i had better not spell it untie) people!

    – s.b.


  33. How do you come to a conclusion that a thing is ‘culturally and politically’ motivated.

    See… policy makers derived a three language policy, wherein one is the Mother tongue, for second one has to choose from ‘National languages’ and third is English. Soem schools even have German and French according to their convenience. You say this system is flawd? Many a schools & colleges teach Samskruta as the first language, and English and Kannada in that order. Some teach Urdu also. If we had Urdu as an option, then there is English and Kannada. People are forced to learn Kannda, but u cant call it a force, since it is the local language that is very much in use and that helps in one’s daily living.

    Then what is force in this scenario? Point I am making here is ‘You Chose to learn Hindi over Samskrita.’ Had Samskrita been an important criterion, there were options.

    Want to know an unfortunate thing? Now a days, at schools, they’re neither teaching languages with interest, nor learning them with interest; Only thing is to clear them to be passed to the next class. 😦

    So, the children are forced to learn languages which they dont want to???


  34. I am just keeping the debate onnn excuse me 😉

  35. some body Says:

    ““If you refuse to converse in Hindi, you lose the opportunity to communicate with so many millions of our brethren!”.

    That argument is very generic. If a person cannot speak Kannada, even he/she will not be able to communicate with millions of their brethren!!! So, that argument is flawed. It assumes magically that somehow Hindi is above the other languages, and that’s exactly where I disagree.”

    here are my points …
    a) however you slice and dice it, hindi is spoken by more people than any other language (except english, which is obviously the holy cow in this discussion, i.e., you don’t have an issue with english being forced on you – in other words, did you ask the school whether they would permit you to take, say, hindi, kannada and sanskrit?)
    b) hindi is one of the two official languages of the country, like it or not.
    c) why are you bringing kannada into this discussion? the issue here is sanskrit vs. hindi, not kannada vs. hindi – give me a liberal estimate of the number of people that can communicate easily in sanskrit vs. a conservative estimate of the number that can do so in hindi. let’s say you are in rural karnataka or rural bihar – what are the chances that you will be able to communicate better in sanskrit than in hindi in either place? i would say about 20 percent in karnataka and about 5 percent in bihar, and i doubt very much if you would get much more than 20 percent that can communicate better in sanskrit than hindi in any other state … well, maybe tamil nadu.

    i don’t know about your specific school, but my recollection of kvs (correct me if i am wrong, neela) is that you had to take both english and hindi as the first two languages, and pick a third – as i was not in karnataka, i got to pick sanskrit. there was really no other option. muslims did not have urdu as a choice. wonder how much you would have rebelled had you been in that boat!! now don’t bring me the argument of hindu majority so sanskrit should be available instead of urdu, because hindi would trump kannada and/or sanskrit with that argument.

    i still don’t understand why exactly you are saying that you were forced to learn hindi, unless that was an in-home coercion. you were under no compulsion of going to this particular school, were you? i am sure that if you had searched, you would have found a school with english, kannada and sanskrit.

    “I wanted to learn Samskruta and I was forced to learn Hindi, and that’s a problem. I had no inclination of learning Hindi, but I was forced to learn the language and that’s a problem.”

    by your own argument, we – who are in the usa – should not teach our kids kannada because that would be forcing the language down their throat, and i vehemently disagree! i would rather have kids in the usa learn kannada than live in karnataka (bengalooru) throughout their lives, go to a mount-something-or-other school in bengalooru, come to the usa on business, and refuse to speak in kannada saying that you don’t know the language and cannot speak it (believe me folks, it happened).

    – s.b.

  36. tarlesubba Says:

    language is the tool that creates ‘reality’ or the ‘reasoning’ of a particular thing..

    srik,
    thats very tantalizing and really way too juicy for me to pass up.

    can you elaborate?


  37. @ Neelanjana:
    Good for you 🙂

    @ Rads:
    Good for you too 🙂

    @ SB:
    I was wondering why nobody brought that up. Then, I thought that people wouldn’t like the “My father can beat your father” arguments. But, I guess I was wrong 😉

    To answer your question, yes there was compulsion to study English. I thought the answer was implicit since I attended an English medium school.

    @ Srik:
    Kannada should certainly be mandatory for students in Karnataka. Similarly Hindi should be mandatory for all the students in Hindi belt area. “Be a Roman when you are in Rome” – I agree with that.

    @ SB:
    A) Yes, Hindi is spoken by more. So? As Neelanjana points out, Mandarin is spoken by more than Hindi speakers.

    B) Hindi is one of the twenty two official languages of the country. Yes, that is a fact.

    C) The issue is neither Samskruta vs Hindi nor Kannada vs Hindi. I was just frustrated at the way Hindi was being propogated to non-Hindi speaking states, that’s all.

    give me a liberal estimate of the number of people that can communicate easily in sanskrit vs. a conservative estimate of the number that can do so in hindi. let’s say you are in rural karnataka or rural bihar – what are the chances that you will be able to communicate better in sanskrit than in hindi in either place? i would say about 20 percent in karnataka and about 5 percent in bihar, and i doubt very much if you would get much more than 20 percent that can communicate better in sanskrit than hindi in any other state … well, maybe tamil nadu.

    LOL…I don’t have anything to answer here. If at all nIlagrIva sees this part of the comment, we can expect a very entertaining comment from him 🙂

    muslims did not have urdu as a choice. wonder how much you would have rebelled had you been in that boat!! now don’t bring me the argument of hindu majority so sanskrit should be available instead of urdu, because hindi would trump kannada and/or sanskrit with that argument.

    Unfair judgment on me. My point is not to make Samskruta available to everyone. Again, my point was just that Hindi was being propogated throughout the nation.

    i still don’t understand why exactly you are saying that you were forced to learn hindi, unless that was an in-home coercion. you were under no compulsion of going to this particular school, were you? i am sure that if you had searched, you would have found a school with english, kannada and sanskrit.

    I thought I answered a similar question from Srik yesterday. I am convinced that I am not a good debater, I should really return all those prizes 😉 On a more serious note, I think I have failed to put forth my arguments clearly. Especially with responses such as “You should have changed your school”, “Didn’t they force English on you?” etc. I see that my post has completely missed it’s intention.

    by your own argument, we – who are in the usa – should not teach our kids kannada because that would be forcing the language down their throat, and i vehemently disagree!

    That’s certainly not my argument, that’s your interpretation. Hmmm…I should not only return the debate prizes, but the essay prizes as well 😉

    ‘At the end of the day’, I have a feeling that you totally understood my post, but are arguing just to pull my leg. Come on, I have seen your comments all over the blogsphere, you are too smart and I will not believe that you did not understand the essence of this post. 🙂

  38. some body Says:

    d.s.:

    i am afraid i am nowhere near as smart as you think i am, becase i am just not getting it.

    in my books, forceful introduction would mean *all* schools requiring hindi. if you can choose which school you want to go to, and can find one that meets your requirements, then you are not being forced to do anything. by choosing an english medium school, you – in essence – tied your own hands and that of the government!

    there is a subtle difference between constitutionally recognized national languages and the constitutionally recognized official languages. the number you quoted – 22 – is that of the recognized languages. there are only two “official languages” – english and hindi. and it is not the fault of anybody in the current system – this was voted for a generation ago! wikipedia, by its very open-source nature, is not always 100% correct, but this should be close enough. also, i don’t know how accurate this is.

    this is similar to the three associations that my condo (unfortunately for me 😦 ) belongs to. when anyone buys a unit, they sign all the legalese whether they read the small print or not, and now – two of the three associations are large enough that small fry like me and my neighbors have not much say in the monthly fees. as the owner bought it out of his/her own volition, would he/she be correct if he/she complains about the high dues that are thrust down his/her throat in the usa? no, he/she would not – it is his/her problem that he/she chose to live in this state, in this city, in this community. and now, he/she either lives with it, or moves to a different place/community.

    “As Neelanjana points out, Mandarin is spoken by more than Hindi speakers.”

    i think that was the logic already used for english! and yes, if china had not invaded india (and nehru lived a few more years as a consequence), i have a feeling that he and his parliamentarian mandarins* (pun intended) might have gone with mandarin ;-).

    – s.b.

    mandarins*: this is probably another of those words that make sense in india in this usage, but are used sparingly, if at all, in the usa.


  39. @ SB:

    I rest my case because I am not sure I am capable of explaining it any better than I have. You are strictly going by technicalities and I am going by practicality, again you may argue on the merits of this statement as well, so I will stop right here 🙂

    Yep, mandarin is a good addition to our list. Honestly, it had been ages since I used it. Nice one there! So, are you keeping the list. I assume you are, else I will have to dig through my blog, the only thing I remember OTOH is “issue”.

  40. some body Says:

    d.s.:

    yup, time to rest those cases, and let bs&sk or yendkudka or anyone else that wants one, have a swig ;-).

    bottom line – too bad you didn’t learn sanskrit, but (and) good that you like hindi (would be nice if you practised it :-).

    re: words –> i thought i had put up a couple more – why not create a static page on the sidebar and i can keep adding as and when i remember. there was a real classic one that i remembered a couple of days ago and have now forgotten. drat! 😦

    how about …

    – spearhead (as in “uthappa spearheaded the thrilling run chase when all appeared lost”) – i’m yet to hear this word used in the usa.
    – piledriver (as in “bhaichang bhutia unleashed a piledriver from 30 metres out into the far top right corner of the net”) – ever heard this being used in nfl football? morten anderson’s piledriver of a try succeeded from 65 yards out 😉

    – s.b.


  41. @ SB:
    I should add a page. I will, not today, but I will, not too late, but I will.

    My boss was confused when I used the word ‘fortnight’. He thought it was a peculiar usage!!!


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